omarmsalah

Omar Muhammad Salah Muhammad Salah من عند Chak 10 Q, Rajasthan 335038، الهند من عند Chak 10 Q, Rajasthan 335038، الهند

قارئ Omar Muhammad Salah Muhammad Salah من عند Chak 10 Q, Rajasthan 335038، الهند

Omar Muhammad Salah Muhammad Salah من عند Chak 10 Q, Rajasthan 335038، الهند

omarmsalah

This is the book that will get you thinking and talking. Unlike your typical ghost story's of visits to us on this plane, here Browne gives us her impressions of what the Other Side looks like. I personally find the concept of a Library on the Other Side fascinating as is her notion that we all sign a contract before coming to Earth so really we're all responsible and aware of what will happen to us here. The message: Don't complain :)

omarmsalah

Review: http://www.booksandculture.com/site/u... "Who were these dangerous fundamentalists who smoked cigars, indulged in French cuisine, and who were apparently determined to take over downtown Moscow?" Haha!! I'll bet I have a good guess... -- I didn't find the book to live up quite to the B&C review's promise. As a presentation of the respective moral worldviews of liberal and evangelical Christians in the Pacific Northwest, and how the respective groups' views on Jesus Christ, the Bible, ritual, prayer, evangelism and missions, and political issues are logically consistent with those worldviews, it's pretty good. Wellman doesn't conceal his self-identity as a liberal Protestant, but he succeeds fairly well at letting his evangelical subjects express their views and appreciating the nuance therein. He also has some interesting ideas on why evangelical churches in the PNW are thriving and most liberal churches are not, and how this, too, is consistent with the respective moral worldviews -- basically, evangelicals have an unwaveringly "entrepreneurial" approach to the faith, by which he means a commitment to reproducing the faith in their children, their communities, and the world, whereas most of the liberals he interviewed were, at best, ambivalent about sharing their faith and growing their churches. I felt the depth of analysis was a little lacking in places. I don't think Wellman considers himself a theologian or historian, but, especially given that he's an ordained Presbyterian minister, his few remarks on the Reformed subset of evangelicalism were confusing: "the Christian Reformed movement [sic?]...is theologically and socially less conservative" than the churches profiled in the book. Granted, it's a little bit out of the evangelical mainstream, but "less conservative"? Really? Of course, readers of various backgrounds would probably have similar critiques and nuances to suggest. For the most part, I'd still recommend this, particularly to Christians who want to get a handle on how the "other side" thinks. I certainly found it reflective of my experience as an evangelical trained in predominantly liberal environments. Though I also found it depressing, as it confirmed that there's little common ground...it's so difficult to communicate with Christians whose presuppositions are so opposite your own, no matter how much you'd like to.