valerygoncff46

Valery Goncharenko Goncharenko من عند بني رام، إسرائيل من عند بني رام، إسرائيل

قارئ Valery Goncharenko Goncharenko من عند بني رام، إسرائيل

Valery Goncharenko Goncharenko من عند بني رام، إسرائيل

valerygoncff46

I would have given this book five stars, if I wasn't seriously let down by the ending. I found one chapter in particular very poetic. The things they carried, "they carried..." line after line of what American soldiers endured during the Vietnam struggle was very well written, as was the entire book. it wasn't as blantely anti-war as others in its genre but still sent a solid message of the consequences of war and what it does to the children who are forced to fight wars for the old. Bueno, I think Vonnegut would have approved.

valerygoncff46

This is in fact the edition I read. Rescued from the transfer station. Short and sweet and read last night. The illustrations were plentiful but only so-so artistically. The story of Buck... Super Dog. A pretty good adventure tale with some pithy writing by JL. Not so good: Indians as villains, Buck's dreams of the "Hairy Man". An honest attempt to get into the heads and "society" of the working dogs of the gold fields. There have been a few movies made but all switch to the human "drama" and include women in the cast. The only woman in this story doesn't stick around long. Probably the inspiration for the incredibly boring comic strip "Mark Trail".

valerygoncff46

Brooks gives us a fascinating glimpse into the life of a seventeenth century English mining village. What I found most interesting was the devolution of societal mores as the plague year unfolded. I hadn't given much thought to the extremes to which people might turn, when faced with the constant threat of invisible death, but it's all here: witchcraft, depravity and total goodness. It might be the totality of that goodness in two main characters that seems implausible and keeps me from giving the 5th star, but this is a gripping and well-written novel.